Pediatric Dentistry

First Visit

According to AAPD (American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry) guidelines, infants should initially visit the pediatric dentist around the time of their first birthday.  First visits can be stressful for parents, especially for parents who have dental phobias themselves.

It is imperative for parents to continually communicate positive messages about dental visits (especially the first one), and to help the child feel as happy as possible about visiting the dentist.

How can I prepare for my child’s first dental visit?

Pediatric dentists are required to undergo extensive training in child psychology.  Their dental offices are generally colorful, child-friendly, and boast a selection of games, toys, and educational tools.  Pediatric dentists (and all dental staff) aim to make the child feel as welcome as possible during all visits.

There are several things parents can do to make the first visit enjoyable.  Some helpful tips are listed below:

Take another adult along for the visit – Sometimes infants become fussy when having their mouths examined.  Having another adult along to soothe the infant allows the parent to ask questions and to attend to any advice the dentist may have.

Leave other children at home – Other children can distract the parent and cause the infant to fuss.  Leaving other children at home (when possible) makes the first visit less stressful for all concerned.

Avoid threatening language – Pediatric dentists and staff are trained to avoid the use of threatening language like “drills,” “needles,” “injections,” and “bleeding.”  It is imperative for parents to use positive language when speaking about dental treatment with their child.

Provide positive explanations – It is important to explain the purposes of the dental visit in a positive way.  Explaining that the dentist “helps keep teeth healthy” is far better than explaining that the dentist “is checking for tooth decay and might have to drill the tooth if decay is found.”

Explain what will happen – Anxiety can be vastly reduced if the child knows what to expect.  Age-appropriate books about visiting the dentist can be very helpful in making the visit seem fun. Here is a list of parent and dentist-approved books:

  • The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist– by Stan and Jan Berenstain.
  • Show Me Your Smile: A Visit to the Dentist – Part of the “Dora the Explorer” Series.
  • Going to the Dentist – by Anne Civardi.
  • Elmo Visits the Dentist – Part of the “Sesame Street” Series.

What will happen during the first visit?

There are several goals for the first dental visit.  First, the pediatric dentist and the child need to get properly acquainted.  Second, the dentist needs to monitor tooth and jaw development to get an idea of the child’s overall health history.  Third, the dentist needs to evaluate the health of the existing teeth and gums.  Finally, the dentist aims to answer questions and advise parents on how to implement a good oral care regimen.

The following sequence of events is typical of an initial “well baby checkup”:

  1. Dental staff will greet the child and parents.
  2. The infant/family health history will be reviewed (this may include questionnaires).
  3. The pediatric dentist will address parental questions and concerns.
  4. More questions will be asked, generally pertaining to the child’s oral habits, pacifier use, general development, tooth alignment, tooth development, and diet.
  5. The dentist will provide advice on good oral care, how to prevent oral injury, fluoride intake, and sippy cup use.
  6. The infant’s teeth will be examined. Generally, the dentist and parent sit facing each other.  The infant is positioned so that his or her head is cradled in the dentist’s lap.  This position allows the infant to look at the parent during the examination.
  7. Good brushing and flossing demonstrations will be provided.
  8. The state of the child’s oral health will be described in detail, and specific recommendations will be made.  Recommendations usually relate to oral habits, appropriate toothpastes and toothbrushes for the child, orthodontically correct pacifiers, and diet.
  9. The dentist will detail which teeth may appear in the following months.
  10. The dentist will outline an appointment schedule and describe what will happen during the next appointment.

If you have questions or concerns about your child’s first dental visit, please contact our office.

How Often Should Children Have Dental Checkups?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentists (AAPD) advises parents to make biannual dental appointments for children, beginning approximately six months after the first tooth emerges.

These two important yearly visits allow the pediatric dentist to monitor new developments in the child’s mouth, evaluate changes in the condition of teeth and gums, and continue to advise parents on good oral care strategies.

The pediatric dentist may schedule additional visits for children who are particularly susceptible to tooth decay or who show early signs of orthodontic problems.

What is the purpose of dental checkups?

First, the pediatric dentist aims to provide a “good dental home” for the child.  If a dental emergency does arise, parents can take the child for treatment at a familiar, comfortable location.

Second, the pediatric dentist keeps meticulous records of the child’s ongoing dental health and jaw development.  In general, painful dental conditions do not arise overnight.  If the pediatric dentist understands the child’s dental health history, it becomes easier to anticipate future issues and intervene before they arise.

Third, the pediatric dentist is able to educate parents and children during the visit.  Sometimes the pediatric dentist wants to introduce one or several factors to enhance tooth health – for example, sealants, fluoride supplements, or xylitol.  Other times, the pediatric dentist asks parents to change the child’s dietary or oral behavior – for example, reducing sugar in the child’s diet, removing an intraoral piercing, or even transitioning the child from sippy cups to adult-sized drinking glasses.

Finally, dental X-rays are often the only way to identify tiny cavities in primary (baby) teeth.  Though the child may not be feeling any pain, left unchecked, these tiny cavities can rapidly turn into large cavities, tooth decay, and eventually, childhood periodontal disease.  Dental X-rays are only used when the pediatric dentist suspects cavities or orthodontic irregularities.

Are checkups necessary if my child has healthy teeth?

The condition of a child’s teeth can change fairly rapidly.  Even if the child’s teeth were evaluated as healthy just six months prior, changes in diet or oral habits (for example, thumb sucking) can quickly render them vulnerable to decay or misalignment.

In addition to visual examinations, the pediatric dentist provides thorough dental cleanings during each visit.  These cleanings eradicate the plaque and debris that can build up between teeth and in other hard to reach places.  Though a good homecare routine is especially important, these professional cleanings provide an additional tool to keep smiles healthy.

The pediatric dentist is also able to monitor the child’s fluoride levels during routine visits.  Oftentimes, a topical fluoride gel or varnish is applied to teeth after the cleaning.  Topical fluoride remineralizes the teeth and staunches mineral loss, protecting tooth enamel from oral acid attacks.  Some children are also given take-home fluoride supplements (especially those residing in areas where fluoride is not routinely added to the community water supply).

Finally, the pediatric dentist may apply dental sealants to the child’s back teeth (molars).  This impenetrable liquid plastic substance is brushed onto the molars to seal out harmful debris, bacteria, and acid.

If you have questions or concerns about when to schedule your child’s dental checkups please contact your pediatric dentist.

Dental Radiographs (X-Rays)

Dental radiographs, also known as dental X-rays, are important diagnostic tools in pediatric dentistry.  Dental radiographs allow the dentist to see and treat problems like childhood cavities, tooth decay, orthodontic misalignment, bone injuries, and bone diseases before they worsen.  These issues would be difficult (in some cases impossible) to see with the naked eye during a clinical examination.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) approves the use of dental radiographs for diagnostic purposes in children and teenagers.  Although radiographs only emit tiny amounts of radiation and are safe to use on an occasional basis, the AAPD guidelines aim to protect young people from unnecessary X-ray exposure.

What are dental X-rays used for?

Dental x-rays are extremely versatile diagnostic tools.  Some of their main uses in pediatric dentistry include:

  • Assessing the amount of space available for incoming teeth.
  • Checking whether primary teeth are being shed in good time for adult teeth to emerge.
  • Evaluating the progression of bone disease.
  • Monitoring and diagnosing tooth decay.
  • Planning treatment (especially orthodontic treatment).
  • Revealing bone injuries, abscesses, and tumors.
  • Revealing impacted wisdom teeth.

When will my child need dental X-rays?

Individual circumstances dictate how often a child needs to have dental radiographs taken.  Children at higher-than-average risk of childhood tooth decay (as determined by the pediatric dentist) may need biannual radiographs to monitor changes in the condition of the teeth.  Likewise, children who are at high risk for orthodontic problems, for example, malocclusion, may also need sets of radiographs taken more frequently for monitoring purposes.

Children at average or below average risk for tooth decay and orthodontic problems should have a set of dental X-rays taken every one to two years.  Even in cases where the pediatric dentist suspects no decay at all, it is still important to periodically monitor tooth and jaw growth – primarily to ensure there is sufficient space available for incoming permanent teeth.

If the oral region has been subject to trauma or injury, the pediatric dentist may want to X-ray the mouth immediately.  Developments in X-ray technology mean that specific areas of the mouth can be targeted and X-rayed separately, reducing the amount of unnecessary X-ray exposure.

What precautions will be taken to ensure my child’s safety?

Though dental radiographs are perfectly safe for use on children, the pediatric dentist will take several precautions to ensure the X-ray process does not unduly damage the child’s cells and bodily tissues.

First, the child will be covered in a lead apron to protect the body from unnecessary exposure.  Second, the dentist will use shields to protect the parts of the face that are not being X-rayed.  Finally, the pediatric dentist will use high-speed film to reduce radiation exposure as much as possible.

If you have questions or concerns about dental radiographs or X-rays, please contact your pediatric dentist.

Fluoride

Fluorine, a natural element in the fluoride compound, has proven to be effective in minimizing childhood cavities and tooth decay.  Fluoride is a key ingredient in many popular brands of toothpaste, oral gel, and mouthwash, and can also be found in most community water supplies.  Though fluoride is an important part of any good oral care routine, overconsumption can result in a condition known as fluorosis.  The pediatric dentist is able to monitor fluoride levels, and check that children are receiving the appropriate amount.

How can fluoride prevent tooth decay?

Fluoride fulfills two important dental functions.  First, it helps staunch mineral loss from tooth enamel, and second, it promotes the remineralization of tooth enamel.

When carbohydrates (sugars) are consumed, oral bacteria feed on them and produce harmful acids.  These acids attack tooth enamel – especially in children who take medications or produce less saliva.  Repeated acid attacks result in cavities, tooth decay, and childhood periodontal disease.  Fluoride protects tooth enamel from acid attacks and reduces the risk of childhood tooth decay.

Fluoride is especially effective when used as part of a good oral hygiene regimen.  Reducing the consumption of sugary foods, brushing and flossing regularly, and visiting the pediatric dentist biannually, all supplement the work of fluoride and keep young teeth healthy.

How much fluoride is enough?

Since community water supplies and toothpastes usually contain fluoride, it is essential that children do not ingest too much.  For this reason, children under the age of two should use an ADA-approved, non-fluoridated brand of toothpaste.  Children between the ages of two and five years old should use a pea-sized amount of ADA-approved fluoridated toothpaste, on a clean toothbrush, twice each day.  They should be encouraged to spit out any extra fluid after brushing.  This part might take time, encouragement, and practice.

The amount of fluoride children ingest between the ages of one and four years old determines whether or not fluorosis occurs later.  The most common symptom of fluorosis is white specks on the permanent teeth.  Children over the age of eight years old are not considered to be at-risk for fluorosis, but should still use an ADA-approved brand of toothpaste.

Does my child need fluoride supplements?

The pediatric dentist is the best person to decide whether a child needs fluoride supplements.  First, the dentist will ask questions in order to determine how much fluoride the child is currently receiving, gain a general health history, and evaluate the sugar content in the child’s diet.  If a child is not receiving enough fluoride and is determined to be at high-risk for tooth decay, an at-home fluoride supplement might be recommended.

Topical fluoride can also be applied to the tooth enamel quickly and painlessly during a regular office visit.  There are many convenient forms of topical fluoride, including foam, liquids, varnishes, and gels.  Depending on the age of the child and their willingness to cooperate, topical fluoride can either be held on the teeth for several minutes in specialized trays or painted on with a brush.

If you have questions or concerns about fluoride or fluorosis, please contact our office.

Care for Your Child’s Teeth

Pediatric oral care has two main components: preventative care at the pediatric dentist’s office and preventative care at home.  Though infant and toddler caries (cavities) and tooth decay have become increasingly prevalent in recent years, a good dental strategy will eradicate the risk of both.

The goal of preventative oral care is to evaluate and preserve the health of the child’s teeth.  Beginning at the age of twelve months, the American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that children begin to visit the pediatric dentist for “well baby” checkups.  In general, most children should continue to visit the dentist every six months, unless instructed otherwise.

How can a pediatric dentist care for my child’s teeth?

The pediatric dentist examines the teeth for signs of early decay, monitors orthodontic concerns, tracks jaw and tooth development, and provides a good resource for parents.  In addition, the pediatric dentist has several tools at hand to further reduce the child’s risk for dental problems, such as topical fluoride and dental sealants.

During a routine visit to the dentist: the child’s mouth will be fully examined; the teeth will be professionally cleaned; topical fluoride might be coated onto the teeth to protect tooth enamel, and any parental concerns can be addressed.  The pediatric dentist can demonstrate good brushing and flossing techniques, advise parents on dietary issues, provide strategies for thumb sucking and pacifier cessation, and communicate with the child on his or her level.

When molars emerge (usually between the ages of two and three), the pediatric dentist may coat them with dental sealant.  This sealant covers the hard-to-reach fissures on the molars, sealing out bacteria, food particles, and acid.  Dental sealant may last for many months or many years, depending on the oral habits of the child.  Dental sealant is an important tool in the fight against tooth decay.

How can I help at home?

Though most parents primarily think of brushing and flossing when they hear the words “oral care,” good preventative care includes many more factors, such as:

Diet – Parents should provide children with a nourishing, well-balanced diet.  Very sugary diets should be modified and continuous snacking should be discouraged.  Oral bacteria ingest leftover sugar particles in the child’s mouth after each helping of food, emitting harmful acids that erode tooth enamel, gum tissue, and bone.  Space out snacks when possible, and provide the child with non-sugary alternatives like celery sticks, carrot sticks, and low-fat yogurt.

Oral habits – Though pacifier use and thumb sucking generally cease over time, both can cause the teeth to misalign.  If the child must use a pacifier, choose an “orthodontically” correct model.  This will minimize the risk of developmental problems like narrow roof arches and crowding.  The pediatric dentist can suggest a strategy (or provide a dental appliance) for thumb sucking cessation.

General oral hygiene – Sometimes, parents clean pacifiers and teething toys by sucking on them.  Parents may also share eating utensils with the child.  By performing these acts, parents transfer harmful oral bacteria to their child, increasing the risk of early cavities and tooth decay.  Instead, rinse toys and pacifiers with warm water, and avoid spoon-sharing whenever possible.

Sippy cup use – Sippy cups are an excellent transitional aid when transferring from a baby bottle to an adult drinking glass.  However, sippy cups filled with milk, breast milk, soda, juice, and sweetened water cause small amounts of sugary fluid to continually swill around young teeth – meaning acid continually attacks tooth enamel.  Sippy cup use should be terminated between the ages of twelve and fourteen months or as soon as the child has the motor skills to hold a drinking glass.

Brushing – Children’s teeth should be brushed a minimum of two times per day using a soft bristled brush and a pea-sized amount of toothpaste.  Parents should help with the brushing process until the child reaches the age of seven and is capable of reaching all areas of the mouth.  Parents should always opt for ADA approved toothpaste (non-fluoridated before the age of two, and fluoridated thereafter).  For babies, parents should rub the gum area with a clean cloth after each feeding.

Flossing – Cavities and tooth decay form more easily between teeth.  Therefore, the child is at risk for between-teeth cavities wherever two teeth grow adjacent to each other.  The pediatric dentist can help demonstrate correct head positioning during the flossing process and suggest tips for making flossing more fun!

Fluoride – Fluoride helps prevent mineral loss and simultaneously promotes the remineralization of tooth enamel.  Too much fluoride can result in fluorosis, a condition where white specks appear on the permanent teeth, and too little can result in tooth decay.  It is important to get the fluoride balance correct.  The pediatric dentist can evaluate how much the child is currently receiving and prescribe supplements if necessary.

If you have questions or concerns about how to care for your child’s teeth, please ask your pediatric dentist.

How to Prevent Cavities

Childhood cavities, also known as childhood tooth decay and childhood caries, are common in children all over the world.  There are two main causes of cavities: poor dental hygiene and sugary diets.

Cavities can be incredibly painful and often lead to tooth decay and childhood periodontitis if left untreated. Ensuring that children eat a balanced diet, embarking on a sound home oral care routine, and visiting the pediatric dentist biannually are all crucial factors for both cavity prevention and excellent oral health.

What causes cavities?

Cavities form when children’s teeth are exposed to sugary foods on a regular basis.  Sugars and carbohydrates (like the ones found in white bread) collect on and around the teeth after eating.  A sticky film (plaque) then forms on the tooth enamel.  The oral bacteria within the plaque continually ingest sugar particles and emit acid.  Initially, the acid attacks the tooth enamel, weakening it and leaving it vulnerable to tooth decay.  If conditions are allowed to worsen, the acid begins to penetrate the tooth enamel and erodes the inner workings of the tooth.

Although primary (baby) teeth are eventually lost, they fulfill several important functions and should be protected.  It is essential that children brush and floss twice per day (ideally more), and visit the dentist for biannual cleanings.  Sometimes the pediatric dentist coats teeth with a sealant and provides fluoride supplements to further bolster the mouth’s defenses.

How will I know if my child has a cavity?

Large cavities can be excruciatingly painful, whereas tiny cavities may not be felt at all.  Making matters even trickier, cavities sometimes form between the teeth, making them invisible to the naked eye.  Dental X-rays and the dentist’s trained eyes help pinpoint even the tiniest of cavities so they can be treated before they worsen.

Some of the major symptoms of cavities include:

  • Heightened sensitivity to cool or warm foods
  • Nighttime waking and crying
  • Pain
  • Sensitivity to spicy foods
  • Toothache

If a child is experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important to visit the pediatric dentist.  Failure to do so will make the problem worse, leave the child in pain, and possibly jeopardize a tooth that could have been treated.

How can I prevent cavities at home?

Biannual visits with the pediatric dentist are only part of the battle against cavities.  Here are some helpful guidelines for cavity prevention:

  1. Analyze the diet – Too many sugary or starchy snacks can expedite cavity formation.  Replace sugary snacks like candy with natural foods where possible, and similarly, replace soda with water.
  2. Cut the snacks – Snacking too frequently can unnecessarily expose teeth to sugars.  Save the sugar and starch for mealtimes, when the child is producing more saliva, and drinking water.  Make sure they consume enough water to cleanse the teeth.
  3. Lose the sippy cup – Sippy cups are thought to cause “baby bottle tooth decay” when they are used beyond the intended age (approximately twelve months).  The small amount of liquid emitted with each sip causes sugary liquid to continually swill around the teeth.
  4. Avoid stickiness – Sticky foods (like toffee) form plaque quickly and are extremely difficult to pry off the teeth.  Avoid them when possible.
  5. Rinse the pacifier – Oral bacteria can be transmitted from mother or father to baby.  Rinse a dirty pacifier with running water as opposed to sucking on it to avoid contaminating the baby’s mouth.
  6. Drinks at bedtime – Sending a child to bed with a bottle or sippy cup is bad news.  The milk, formula, juice, or sweetened water basically sits on the teeth all night – attacking enamel and maximizing the risk of cavities.  Ensure the child has a last drink before bedtime, and then brush the teeth.
  7. Don’t sweeten the pacifier – Parents sometimes dip pacifiers in honey to calm a cranky child.  Do not be tempted to do this.  Use a blanket, toy, or hug to calm the child instead.
  8. Brush and floss – Parents should brush and floss their child’s teeth twice each day until the child reaches the age of seven years old.  Before this time, children struggle to brush every area of the mouth effectively.
  9. Check on fluoride –When used correctly, fluoride can strengthen tooth enamel and help stave off cavities.  Too much or too little fluoride can actually harm the teeth, so ask the pediatric dentist for a fluoride assessment.
  10. Keep to appointments – The child’s first dental visit should be scheduled around his or her first birthday, as per the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) guidelines.  Keep to a regular appointment schedule to create healthy smiles!

If you have questions or concerns about cavity prevention, please contact our office.

Eruption of Your Child’s Teeth

The eruption of primary teeth (also known as deciduous or baby teeth) follows a similar developmental timeline for most children.  A full set of primary teeth begins to grow beneath the gums during the fourth month of pregnancy. For this reason, a nourishing prenatal diet is of paramount importance to the infant’s teeth, gums, and bones.

Generally, the first primary tooth breaks through the gums between the ages of six months and one year.  By the age of three years old most children have a “full” set of twenty primary teeth.  The American Dental Association (ADA) encourages parents to make a “well-baby” appointment with a pediatric dentist approximately six months after the first tooth emerges.  Pediatric dentists communicate with parents and children about prevention strategies, emphasizing the importance of a sound, “no tears” daily home care plan.

Although primary teeth are deciduous, they facilitate speech production, proper jaw development, good chewing habits, and the proper spacing and alignment of adult teeth.  Caring properly for primary teeth helps defend against painful tooth decay, premature tooth loss, malnutrition, and childhood periodontal disease.

In what order do primary teeth emerge?

As a general rule-of-thumb, the first teeth to emerge are the central incisors (very front teeth) on the lower and upper jaws (6-12 months).  These (and any other primary teeth) can be cleaned gently with a soft, clean cloth to reduce the risk of bacterial infection.  The central incisors are the first teeth to be lost, usually between 6 and 7 years of age.

Next, the lateral incisors (immediately adjacent to the central incisors) emerge on the upper and lower jaws (9-16 months).  These teeth are lost next, usually between 7 and 8 years of age.  First molars, the large flat teeth towards the rear of the mouth, then emerge on the upper and lower jaws (13-19 months).  The eruption of molars can be painful.  Clean fingers, cool gauzes, and teething rings are all useful in soothing discomfort and soreness. First molars are generally lost between 9 and 11 years of age.

Canine (cuspid) teeth then tend to emerge on the upper and lower jaws (16-23 months).  Canine teeth can be found next to the lateral incisors and are lost during preadolescence (10-12 years old).  Finally, second molars complete the primary set on the lower and upper jaw (23-33 months). Second molars can be found at the very back of the mouth and are lost between the ages of 10 and 12 years old.

What else is known about primary teeth?

Though each child is unique, baby girls generally have a head start on baby boys when it comes to primary tooth eruption.  Lower teeth usually erupt before opposing upper teeth in both sexes.

Teeth usually erupt in pairs – meaning that there may be months with no new activity and months where two or more teeth emerge at once.  Due to smaller jaw size, primary teeth are smaller than permanent teeth, and appear to have a whiter tone.  Finally, an interesting mixture of primary and permanent teeth is the norm for most school-age children.

If you have questions or concerns about primary teeth, please contact our office.

Dental Emergencies

Although dental injuries and dental emergencies are often distressing for both children and parents, they are also extremely common.  Approximately one third of children have experienced some type of dental trauma, and more have experienced a dental emergency.

There are two peak risk periods for dental trauma – the first being toddlerhood (18-40 months) when environmental exploration begins, and the second being the preadolescent/adolescent period, when sporting injuries become commonplace.

Detailed below are some of the most common childhood dental emergencies, in addition to helpful advice on how to deal with them.

Toothache

Toothache is common in children of all ages and rarely occurs without cause.  Impacted food can cause discomfort in young children, and can be dislodged using a toothbrush, a clean finger, or dental floss.  If pain persists, contact the pediatric dentist.  Some common causes of toothache include: tooth fractures, tooth decay, tooth trauma, and wisdom teeth eruption (adolescence).

How you can help:

  1. Cleanse the area using warm water.  Do not medicate or warm the affected tooth or adjacent gum area.
  2. Check for impacted food and remove it as necessary.
  3. Apply a cold compress to the affected area to reduce swelling.
  4. Contact the pediatric dentist to seek advice.

Dental avulsion (knocked-out tooth)

If a tooth has been knocked-out of the child’s mouth completely, it is important to contact the pediatric dentist immediately.  In general, pediatric dentists do not attempt to reimplant avulsed primary (baby) teeth, because the reimplantation procedure itself can cause damage to the tooth bud, and thereby damage the emerging permanent tooth.

Pediatric dentists always attempt to reimplant avulsed permanent teeth, unless the trauma has caused irreparable damage.  The reimplantation procedure is almost always more successful if it is performed within one hour of the avulsion, so time is of the essence!

How you can help:

  1. Recover the tooth.  Do not touch the tooth roots! Handle the crown only.
  2. Rinse off dirt and debris with water without scrubbing or scraping the tooth.
  3. For older children, insert the tooth into its original socket using gentle pressure, or encourage the child to place the tooth in the cheek pouch.  For younger children, submerge the tooth in a glass of milk or saliva (do not attempt to reinsert the tooth in case the child swallows it).
  4. Do not allow the tooth to dry during transportation.  Moisture is critically important for reimplantation success.
  5. Visit the pediatric dentist (where possible) or take the child to the Emergency Room immediately –time is critical in saving the tooth.

Dental intrusion (tooth pushed into jawbone)

Sometimes, dental trauma forces a tooth (or several teeth) upwards into the jawbone.  The prognosis is better for teeth that have been pushed up to a lesser extent (less than 3mm), but every situation is unique.  Oftentimes, the force of the trauma is great enough to injure the tooth’s ligament and fracture its socket.

If dental intrusion of either the primary or permanent teeth is suspected, it is important to contact the pediatric dentist immediately.  Depending on the nature and depth of the intrusion, the pediatric dentist will either wait for the tooth to descend naturally, or perform root canal therapy to preserve the structure of the tooth.

How you can help:

  1. Rinse the child’s mouth with cold water.
  2. Place ice packs around affected areas to reduce swelling.
  3. Offer Tylenol for pain relief.
  4. Contact the pediatric dentist where possible, or proceed to the Emergency Room.

Tooth luxation/extrusion/lateral displacement (tooth displacement)

Tooth displacement is generally classified as “luxation,” “extrusion,” or “lateral displacement,” depending on the orientation of the tooth following trauma.  A luxated tooth remains in the socket – with the pulp intact about half of the time.  However, the tooth protrudes at an unnatural angle and the underlying jawbone is oftentimes fractured.

The term “extrusion” refers to a tooth that has become partly removed from its socket.  In young children, primary tooth extrusions tend to heal themselves without medical treatment.  However, dental treatment should be sought for permanent teeth that have been displaced in any manner in order to save the tooth and prevent infection.  It is important to contact the pediatric dentist if displacement is suspected.

How you can help:

  1. Place a cold, moist compress on the affected area.
  2. Offer pain relief (for example, Children’s Tylenol).
  3. Contact the pediatric dentist immediately.

Crown fracture

The crown is the largest, most visible part of the tooth.  In most cases, the crown is the part of the tooth that sustains trauma.  There are several classifications of crown fracture, ranging from minor enamel cracks (not an emergency) to pulp exposure (requiring immediate treatment).

The pediatric dentist can readily assess the severity of the fracture using dental X-rays, but any change in tooth color (for example, pinkish or yellowish tinges inside the tooth) is an emergency warning sign.  Minor crown fractures often warrant the application of dental sealant, whereas more severe crown fractures sometimes require pulp treatments.  In the case of crown fracture, the pediatric dentist should be contacted. Jagged enamel can irritate and inflame soft oral tissues, causing infection.

How you can help:

  1. Rinse the child’s mouth with warm water.
  2. Place a cold, moist compress on the affected area.
  3. Offer strong pain relief (for example, Children’s Tylenol).
  4. Pack the tooth with a biocompatible material.
  5. Visit the pediatric dentist or Emergency Room depending on availability and the severity of the injury.

Root fracture

A root fracture is caused by direct trauma, and isn’t noticeable to the naked eye.  If a root fracture is suspected, dental x-rays need to be taken.  Depending on the exact positioning of the fracture and the child’s level of discomfort, the tooth can be monitored, treated, or extracted as a worse case scenario.

How you can help:

  1. Place a cold, moist compress on the affected area.
  2. Offer pain relief (for example, Children’s Tylenol).
  3. Contact the pediatric dentist.

Dental concussion

A tooth that has not been dislodged from its socket or fractured, but has received a bang or knock, can be described as “concussed.”  Typically occurring in toddlers, dental concussion can cause the tooth to discolor permanently or temporarily.  Unless the tooth turns black or dark (indicating that the tooth is dying and may require root canal therapy), dental concussion does not require emergency treatment.

Injured cheek, lip or tongue

If the child’s cheek, lip or tongue is bleeding due to an accidental cut or bite, apply firm direct pressure to the area using a clean cloth or gauze.  To reduce swelling, apply ice to the affected areas.  If the bleeding becomes uncontrollable, proceed to the Emergency Room or call a medical professional immediately.

Fractured jaw

If a broken or fractured jaw is suspected, proceed immediately to the Emergency Room.  In the meantime, encourage the child not to move the jaw.  In the case of a very young child, gently tie a scarf lengthways around the head and jaw to prevent movement.

Head injury/head trauma

If the child has received trauma to the head, proceed immediately to the Emergency Room.  Even if consciousness has not been lost, it is important for pediatric doctors to rule out delayed concussion and internal bleeding.

If you have questions about dental emergencies, please ask your pediatric dentist.

 

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